Hydroboreal | Sri Yantra – Yin Yang-Chi
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Sri Yantra – Yin Yang-Chi

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Sri yantra, also known as Sri Chakra, is called the mother of all yantras because all other yantras derive from it. In its three dimensional forms Sri Yantra is said to represent Mount Meru, the cosmic mountain at the center of the universe.

 

The Sri Yantra is conceived as a place of spiritual pilgrimage. It is a representation of the cosmos at the macrocosmic level and of the human body at the microcosmic level (each of the circuits correspond to a chakra of the body).

 

Sri Yantra is first referred to in an Indonesian inscription dating to the seventh century C.E. It may have existed in India, its country of origin, long before the time of its introduction to Indonesia.

 

The Sri Yantra is a configuration of nine interlocking triangles, surrounded by two circles of lotus petals with the whole encased within a gated frame, called the “earth citadel”. The nine interlocking triangles centered around the bindu (the central point of the yantra) are drawn by the superimposition of five downward pointing triangles, representing Shakti ; the female principle and four upright triangles, representing Shiva ; the male principle. The nine interlocking triangles form forty three small triangles each housing a presiding deity associated with particular aspects of existence.

 

Man’s spiritual journey from the stage of material existence to ultimate enlightenment is mapped on the Sri Yantra. The spiritual journey is taken as a pilgrimage in which every step is an ascent to the center, a movement beyond one’s limited existence, and every level is nearer to the goal. Such a journey is mapped in stages, and each of these stages corresponds with one of the circuits of which the Sri Yantra is composed from the outer plane to the bindu in the center.

 

The Sri Yantra is a tool to give a vision of the totality of existence, so that the adept may internalize its symbols for the ultimate realization of his unity with the cosmos.

 

The goal of contemplating the Sri Yantra is that the adept can rediscover his primordial sources. The circuits symbolically indicate the successive phases in the process of becoming.

 

What is Yin Yang?

 

Yin Yang is perhaps the most known and documented concept used within Taoism.

 

A starting definition: Yin / Yang : Two halves that together complete wholeness. Yin and yang are also the starting point for change. When something is whole, by definition it is unchanging and complete. So when you split something into two halves – yin / yang, it upsets the equilibrium of wholeness. This starts both halves chasing after each other as they seek a new balance with each other.

 

The word Yin comes out to mean “shady side” and Yang “sunny side”.

 

Yin Yang is the concept of duality forming a whole. We encounter examples of Yin and Yang every day. As examples: night (Yin) and day (Yang), female (Yin) and male (Yang). Over thousands of years quite a bit has been sorted and grouped under various Yin Yang classification systems.

 

The symbol for Yin Yang is called the Taijitu. Most people just call it the yin yang symbol in the west. The taijitu symbol has been found in more than one culture and over the years has come to represent Taoism.

 

Diving Deeper into Yin Yang

 

Yin Yang illustrated from the Tao Te Ching [2]

 

When people see things as beautiful,
ugliness is created.
When people see things as good,
evil is created.

 

Being and non-being produce each other.
Difficult and easy complement each other.
Long and short define each other.
High and low oppose each other.
Fore and aft follow each other.

 

Basic Concepts Defining the Nature of Yin Yang

 

  1. Neither Yin nor Yang are absolute.

    Nothing is completely Yin or completely Yang. Each aspect contains the beginning point for the other aspect. For example: day becomes night and then night becomes day…Yin and Yang are interdependent upon each other so that the definition of one requires the definition for the other to be complete.

  2. Yin Yang is not static.

    The nature of Yin and Yang flows and changes with time. A simple example is thinking about how the day gradually flows into night. However, the length of day and night are changing. As the earth ages, its spin is slowing causing the length of day and night to get longer. Day and night are not static entities.Sometimes changes in the relationship between Yin and Yang can be dramatic where one aspect can literally just transform into the other. As an example: some species of fish have females that transform quickly into males when the population of males aren’t enough.

  3. The summation of Yin and Yang form a whole.

    One effect of this is: as one aspect increases the other decreases to maintain overall balance of the whole.

  4. The balance of Yin Yang can be skewed due to outside influences.

    Four possible imbalances exist:

    • Deficiency Yang

    • Deficiency Yin

    • Excess Yang

    • Excess Yin

     

    These imbalances can be paired: so an excess of Yin can also simulate a Yang deficiency and vice versa.

     

    As an example this concept is especially important for Chinese healing practices. So an excess of Yang results in a fever. An excess of Yin could mean the accumulation of fluids in the body. Chinese healing examines a person’s health is in terms of the eight principles: Internal and External stimuli, Deficiency and Excesses, Cold and Heat and Yin and Yang.

     

  5. Yin Yang can be subdivided into additional Yin and Yang aspects.

    For example a Yang aspect of Heat: can be further subdivided into a Yin warm or Yang burning.

  6. Additional principles defining Yin and Yang qualities exist.

    The concepts listed here are merely a starting point to illustrate the nature of Yin and Yang. Usually as a practice Taoism does a good job of not codifying life. Which is ironic since many Taoist’s can happily list out what is Yin and what is Yang. Typically Taoist texts will list a few examples of Yin and Yang and then meander off to the next topic. Which makes sense as from a Taoist perspective it’s for the reader to reveal life from their own perspective. As an example go back to the Taoist passage quoted above from the Tao Te Ching. You will discover a few additional aspects to Yin and Yang, but the passage isn’t a complete definition either. The author of this passage fully expects you as the reader to go out and to explore the ideas on your own.

  7. This is only the start. You can dig into Yin Yang in an infinite manner due to its relative nature.

 

Additional material for Yin Yang can be read here:

 

Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Yin Yang

 

How Yin Yang Flows

 

Now forget everything you have learned about Yin and Yang for a moment. Step back from all the descriptions and classifications of Yin and Yang to consider the following passage from the Tao Te Ching:

 

The Way begot one,
And the one, two;
Then the two begot three
And three, all else.

 

A clearer understanding of Yin Yang requires looking back into the Tao. The Tao can be considered as the fundamental absolute. Upon examination: the nature of the Tao expands out. This process of expansion defines a pattern, splitting apart into finer and finer patterns. Yin and Yang is the point where perception demarks the Tao’s expansion into one and then one into two.

 

Taoism as a practice enjoys examining patterns. Over the years countless sects of Taoism have formed and quite a bit of literature written over the delineation and description of these patterns. Often times Taoists use the concept of Yin Yang as a familiar starting template to work with patterns.

 

For example Qigong is based upon the patterns of breath and physical movement. Knowledge of bodily patterns forms the basis of this Taoist practice to keep a body healthy. The human body and its movements are divided according to Yin and Yang categories. So the upper body corresponds to the Yang, while the lower body roots into the Yin. The body’s center is where the Yin and Yang meet. Qi Gong exercises are grouped and explained in terms of Yin and Yang to help classify the body’s harmonies into a working practice. Knowledge of Yin or Yang isn’t required to perform Qi Gong, instead it’s an additional filter which helps people connect to the practice.

 

Another example is Taoist divination within the Book of Changes / I Ching. Divination in Taoism is a practice of examining human interactions based on well known psychological patterns. To generate a result either coins or yarrow stalks are tossed down to form a pattern. The patterns generated correspond to Yin and Yang defined qualities. The nature of the Yin and Yang pattern are applied against the psychology of the moment to return advice for the person asking the question.

 

Yin Yang is a fundamental aspect of Taoist thought. We always naturally apply human based values over naturally occurring patterns. However, remember it’s also important not to chase finer and finer descriptions of these patterns, to do so would be to chase down infinity.

 

Yin Yang is a system of recognizing how to separate out patterns in our life while also relaxing to accept the overall whole and complete nature of the Tao.

 

What is Chi?

 

Put simply, chi (qi) is that which gives life. In terms of the body, chi is that which differentiates a corpse from a live human being.

 

To use a Biblical reference, it is that which God breathed into the dust to produce Adam. Chi is also the basis of acupuncture.

 

A strong life force makes a human being totally alive, alert and present while a weak force results in sluggishness and fatigue. You can increase and develop your chi to overcome illness, become more vibrant and enhance mental capacity.

 

The concept of a life force is found in most of the ancient cultures of the world. In India, it is called prana; in China, chi; in Japan, ki; for Native Americans, the Great Spirit. For all these cultures and others as well, the idea of life force is or was central to their forms of medicine and healing.

 

Both Traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture are based on balancing and enhancing chi to bring the body into a state of health.

 

Energy can be increased in a human being. Consequently, the development of chi can make an ill person robust or a weak person vibrant. More chi can enhance mental capacity too.

 

The concept of chi also extends beyond the physical body, to the subtle energies that activate all human functions, including emotions and thought. Unbalanced chi causes your emotions to become agitated and distressed. Balanced chi causes your emotions to become smooth and more satisfying.

 

From the perspective of thought, when your mental chi becomes more refined it enhances your creativity at all levels–art, business, relationships, child rearing, etc.

 

Spiritual chi makes it more possible for us to personally enter into higher states of consciousness, which lie at the heart of religious experience.

 

Qigong, tai chi and other form of Taoist martial and healing arts, help you to develop subtle chi-energy, not as an idea but rather lead you to directly feel and experience what this is in your body.

 

To learn one of the best and easist ways to learn to feel chi please checkout one of our most popular qigong exercise sets: Dragon and Tiger Medical Qigong.

 

To maintain pain-free, optimal health, chi or energy should circulate throughout your entire body, without disruption, in a smooth, powerful fashion.

 

The classic Chinese medical phrase is teng jr bu tong. If the circulation of your chi is blocked (bu tong), you have pain and disease (teng). Conversely, if your chi or life force energy in your acupuncture meridian lines if fully connected and circulating without blockages (tong), you have neither pain nor disease (bu tong) – tong jr bu teng.

 

Making your chi tong i is the most basic goal of Chinese medicine and most apparent with tai chi, qigong and acupunture. Balancing out and connecting your chi so that it has no blockages will both get rid of the pain of disease and make you feel a whole lot better.